Whats up in urban bio resources application

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Food after oil: how urban farmers are preparing us for a self-sufficient future
By Richard Benson

Bristol is at the head of a food phenomenon that is helping residents better connect with their cities and each other

If you travel by train into Bristol from north of the city, there is a point two miles from the centre when you can catch sight of a tiny farmyard. Nestling at the bottom of a railway embankment between houses, builders yards and a car rental depot, it has sties, snoozing Gloucester Old Spot pigs, a paddock with ...

Read more here:

https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2019/aug/18/food-after-oil-how-urban-farmers-are-preparing-us-for-a-self-sufficient-future?fbclid=IwAR3gLNQi73Xi3uhDE2c2JtHFBvkd_V1tW3sQXYwj94DOKd8JQmr4hNI0kk4

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Rooftop farming: why vertical gardening is blooming in Kampala
By Nils Adler in Kampala

"Ugandans are finding creative solutions to the growing challenges of urbanisation.

When Martin Agaba realised his urban farm had run out of space, he decided the solution was not to expand outwards but upwards.

“We realised we had to use the roof,” he says. Of all the innovations that have galvanised people in his district in the Ugandan capital Kampala to grow their own food, these vertical box plantations remain his favourite."

Read more here:

https://psychcentral.com/news/2018/07/22/turning-vacant-lots-into-green-spaces-shown-to-reduce-depression/137171.html#.W1hqnRYZ_5M.facebook

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Turning Vacant Lots Into Green Spaces Shown to Reduce Depression
By Janice Wood
~ 3 min read
Turning vacant urban land into green spaces significantly reduces feelings of depression and improves overall mental health for the surrounding residents, according to a new study.

The findings have implications for cities across the United States, where 15 percent of land is deemed “vacant” and often blighted or filled with trash and overgrown vegetation, according to researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine and the School of Arts & Sciences at the University of Pennsylvania.

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Read more here:

https://psychcentral.com/news/2018/07/22/turning-vacant-lots-into-green-spaces-shown-to-reduce-depression/137171.html#.W1hqnRYZ_5M.facebook